Obama Wins Wisconsin; Poised for 10 in a Row

With a projected victory Tuesday in Wisconsin, Sen. Barack Obama is poised for 10 straight victories with the Illinois senator favored in Hawaii’s Democratic caucus, the state where Obama was born. The victory in Wisconsin puts Sen. Hillary Clinton in a must win position heading into contests in Ohio and Texas on March 4.

In Wisconsin, Obama has 56 percent of the vote to Clinton’s 43 percent, with 4 percent of precincts reporting.

Like a week ago in Maryland and Virginia, exit polls out of Wisconsin show Obama making serious inroads into Hillary Clinton’s base – female voters and white voters. READ MORE

On the Republican side, Sen. John McCain is the projected winner in Wisconsin. The McCain campaign is hoping that decsive wins Tuesday in Wisconsin and Washington state will knock Huckabee out of the race for the Republican nomination.

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McCain beats Romney to win Fla. primary

By DAVID ESPO and LIZ SIDOTI, Associated Press Writers
MIAMI – Sen. John McCain won a breakthrough triumph in the Florida primary Tuesday night, gaining the upper hand in the battle for the Republican presidential nomination ahead of next week’s contests across 21 states. Former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani appeared ready to quit the race.

“It shows one thing. I’m the conservative leader who can unite the party,” McCain said in a brief interview with The Associated Press.

“It’s a very significant boost, but I think we’ve got a tough week ahead and a lot of states to come.”
The victory was worth 57 national convention delegates for McCain, a winner-take-all haul that catapulted him ahead of Romney for the overall delegate lead.
Giuliani ran third, his best showing of the campaign but not nearly good enough for the one-time front-runner who decided to make his last stand in a state that is home to tens of thousands of transplanted New Yorkers.
In remarks to supporters in Orlando, he referred to his candidacy repeatedly in the past tense — as though it was over. “We’ll stay involved and together we’ll make sure that we’ll do everything we can to hand our nation off to the next generation better than it was before,” he said.
Former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee trailed, but told supporters he would campaign on. Texas Rep. Ron Paul was fifth, and last.
Romney, who has spent millions of dollars of his personal fortune to run for the White House, also vowed to stay in the race.
“At a time like this, America needs a president in the White House who has actually had a job in the real economy,” he told supporters in St. Petersburg.
Florida marked the end of one phase of the campaign, the last in a series of single-state contests.
The campaign goes national next week, with 21 states holding primaries and caucuses on Tuesday and 1,023 party convention delegates at stake.
Returns from 73 percent of the state’s precincts showed McCain, the Arizona senator, with 36 percent of the vote and Romney, the former governor of Massachusetts, with 31 percent.
The victory was another step in one of the most remarkable political comebacks of recent times. McCain entered the race the front-runner, then found his campaign unraveling last summer as his stands in favor of the Iraq War and a controversial immigration bill proved unpopular.
The war gradually became less of a concern after President Bush’s decision to increase troop deployments began to produce results. McCain also sought to readjust his position on immigration.
By the time of the New Hampshire primary, he was primed for victory, and got it. He won the South Carolina primary last week, taking first place in the state that had snuffed out his presidential hopes in 2000.

Michigan Primary Update

Romney Wins Michigan Primary

In what amounted to a must win for his presidential campaign, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney is the projected winner of tonight’s Michigan presidential primary. With 11 percent of precincts reporting, Romney has 37 percent of the vote; McCain, 31 percent. Last week, Romney pulled his resources out of South Carolina and Florida to focus solely on the state where his father was once governor — a strategy that appears to have paid off. READ MORE

On the Democratic side, Sen. Hillary Clinton’s name was the only one on the Michigan ballot among the top three Democratic contendors. Sen. Barack Obama and former Sen. John Edwards removed their names from the ballot after the DNC revoked the state’s delegates to the national convention for moving the state’s primary to Jan. 15 in violation of DNC rules.
With 12 percent of precincts reporting, Clinton has 61 percent of the vote; uncommited 34 percent. READ MORE

McCain Surges to Lead in New Poll

CBS News
Posted: 2008-01-14 10:41:49
Filed Under: Elections News
(Jan. 13) – Surging after his win in the New Hampshire primary, Arizona Sen. John McCain has come from behind to now lead the national Republican race, according to a new CBS News/New York Times poll. However, among Democrats, New York Sen. Hillary Clinton has maintained her double-digit national lead in the race, despite winning only one of the two contests so far.McCain is now the choice of 33 percent of Republican primary voters in the poll, up from just seven percent in the last CBS News/New York Times poll taken in December. Former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee is in second place with 18 percent, down from 21 percent in December. The biggest drop downward is in former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani’s support, from leading at 22 percent in the last poll to ten percent now. Former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney and former Tennessee Sen. Fred Thompson are tied in this poll at eight percent.

McCain Projected to Win N.H. Republican Primary

With 12 percent of precincts reporting, Arizona Sen. John McCain is projected to win the New Hampshire Republican primary. He leads with 37 percent of the vote; former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney follows with 28 percent of the vote.

Check www.campaignsandelections.com later for full analysis and results.

Liberman endorses McCain

Senator Joe Lieberman will finally come clean on Monday, unleashing his inner-Republican to endorse the struggling campaign of Senator John McCain, according to several news reports. It is a bittersweet alliance for both men. Lieberman’s move confirms his critics’ longtime argument that he is a “Democrat in Name Only,” while McCain looks desperate by leaning on backers beyond the G.O.P. base in the homestretch of a partisan primary.
During his 2006 reelection campaign, Lieberman emphasized that he would support Democratic candidates in 2008. “I want Democrats to be back in the majority in Washington and elect a Democratic president in 2008,” he said during a televised debate in July. Lieberman promptly backtracked after his reelection, announcing this January that he was “open” to supporting a Republican or Democrat for president, depending “on a whole range of issues.” By not even waiting to see who the Democrats nominate, now Lieberman is revealing that the issues aren’t important to him, either.Click here to read more.